Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander vaccine communications for your practice

This page provides discussion topics and links to posters and social media tiles for your practice to provide clear and consistent information on COVID-19 vaccines for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander patients.


Below, you’ll find suggested social tiles and captions that you could use across your social media platform - as well as a social media template to personalise and share. It includes editable and printable posters and fact sheets that you can use and distribute regarding information about the vaccine and a collection of videos that you can share within the community and answer any questions they may have.

Also, two community announcement radio scripts, reminding everyone on the importance of keeping two big steps away from others, washing hands regularly, getting tested if you’re unwell, and following state and territory guidelines and restrictions.

Please use these assets as you see fit and adapt to your local requirements.

Deptment of Health talking points

We recommend this information to assist healthcare workers talk about COVID-19 vaccines working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Social media content

Here are some examples of social media posts that you could use across your social media platform. Please feel free to change the content as you see fit. See all social media tiles and captions on the website.

Also available in wide (landscape)

Get your second dose

If you’ve had your first dose of the #COVID19 #vaccine, you’re halfway there! The vaccines are most effective when you’ve received two doses within the recommended timeframe. That’s 3 weeks for #Pfizer, and between 4 and 12 weeks for #AstraZeneca.

Without the second dose, your body will not be able to fight COVID-19 as effectively. Have a yarn with your healthcare worker today to make an appointment for your #seconddose.


Also available in wide (landscape)

Keep safe with borders opening up

#Australia is working hard to keep state borders open, so that we can travel to different parts of our beautiful country! Even if there are no cases in your community, with people coming and going in your area, it’s important to do what you can to keep safe.

Keep washing your hands regularly, stay two big steps away from others, stay home if you don’t feel well, and get tested if you have any #COVID19 symptoms. Most importantly, when you have a chance to, get your COVID-19 #vaccine.


Also available in wide (landscape)

Will COVID-19 vaccines work against new variants?

All viruses change or mutate slightly over time. The longer that #COVID19 goes around communities across the world, the more chances it has to mutate. This is why #stoppingthespread of the virus is so important.

The COVID-19 vaccines available in #Australia will still be effective against new variants of the virus. If COVID-19 continues to mutate, it may mean that people will need to be vaccinated again in the future.

Visit the ‘Is it true?’ page on health.gov.au to get the most up to date information.


Also available in wide(landscape)

Children and the COVID-19 vaccines

#COVID19 vaccines are available for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders 16 years and over. Children 15 and younger are not able to get a COVID-19 vaccine. This is because children were not included in the initial clinical trials of the vaccines – which is very common practice.

More studies and trials are taking place in other countries with children included. The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) will continue to look at the results, and make recommendations based on the information available.


COVID-19 vaccines are available to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders

#COVID19 vaccines are available to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 16 years and over. The vaccines are free and will help protect you from getting really sick from COVID-19. Have a yarn with your local healthcare worker, or visit covid-vaccine.healthdirect.gov.au/eligibility to find out where you can get your vaccine.


Also available in wide(landscape)

COVID-19 vaccines are free

Everyone in Australia can get a free #COVID19 vaccination, and all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 16 years are eligible to receive the vaccine.

Have a yarn with your local healthcare worker about where you can get your #vaccine or visit health.gov.au


Side effects of COVID-19 vaccines

Even though not everyone gets them, mild side effects such as feeling sick, a sore arm, fever, muscle aches or headaches are a sign that the #vaccine is working to create an immune response. For most people, symptoms usually last for a couple of days.

If you have a side effect that worries you, please yarn to your healthcare worker or call your health clinic.


Also available in wide(landscape)

Side effects of COVID-19 vaccines

#COVID19 #outbreaks are still happening across the country. #StaySafe by staying informed! Keep up to date by visiting your state or territory website, or health.gov.au.


#COVID19 #outbreaks are still happening throughout insert state/territory name. If you feel unwell or have been at an exposure site, go get a COVID-19 test. When you’re feeling fit and healthy, make an appointment to get your COVID-19 vaccine! The COVID-19 #vaccine is now available to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 16 years and over. To make an appointment, have a yarn with your healthcare worker, or visit covid-vaccine.healthdirect.gov.au/eligibility insert state booking system, if applicable


Stay safe by staying informed. Current outbreaks mean rules are changing quickly. Stay up to date by visiting insert your state or territory government’s social pages and website. When you need to go out into the community, do your best to keep as much distance between you and others as possible. A good way to do that is to keep at least two big steps away.


#COVID19 symptoms often look the same as cold or flu symptoms. Keep an eye out for a headache, runny nose, sore throat, or a fever. If you feel unwell, go and get a COVID-19 test and stay home till you get your results. Find out where you can get a COVID-19 test near you at insert state/territory health website


Everyone in our community can be affected by #COVID19, but the elderly are most at risk from getting really sick from the virus. The best way to protect yourself from COVID-19 is to get vaccinated. The COVID-19 #vaccine is now available to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 16 years and over. To make an appointment, have a yarn with your healthcare worker, or visit covid-vaccine.healthdirect.gov.au/eligibility insert state booking system, if applicable


Social media template

This social media template, created for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, will allow you to upload your photo and then share it across your social media channels with your personal reasons why you are getting vaccinated against COVID-19.

Download the Powerpoint template from Department of Health.


Fact sheets

Printable fact sheets that you can distribute to patients, that will provide more information about the vaccination process.

Giving your consent

This easy-to-read fact sheet explains why you need to agree to get vaccinated and what are the different ways that you can give your consent before your COVID-19 vaccine. Download fact sheet from the website.

Download the factsheet from Department of Health (PDF | 1 MB | 4 pages).


COVID-19 vaccine side effects

This easy-to-read fact sheet outlines the side effects of COVID-19 vaccines and what to do if you feel them.

Download the factsheet from Department of Health (PDF | 1.1 MB | 9 pages).


After your COVID-19 vaccination

Printable fact sheets that may be distributed to patients, following their vaccine, with important information about what to expect after their vaccination. This fact sheet is available in an icon version, and a text version.

Download the factsheet from Department of Health (PDF | 11.5 MB | 1 page).


Posters

Downloadable posters with different information about the COVID-19 vaccination, designed for vaccine providers.

A downloadable poster that can be used by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander vaccine providers in their clinics or on their websites to update patients with new recommendations from Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (issued on 17 June 2021).

Download the factsheet from Department of Health (PDF | 377 KB | 1 page).


This poster, designed for vaccine providers, outlines that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 16 years and over can now have their COVID-19 vaccine.

Download the factsheet from Department of Health (PDF | 377 KB | 1 page).


This poster explains what you can do to stay informed about COVID-19 vaccines.

We are working to make sure everyone in Australia has access to safe, effective and free COVID-19 vaccines. Vaccines will give us the protection to go about our COVID Safe lives.

Download the factsheet from Department of Health (PDF | 7.6 MB | 1 page).


Revised Guidance for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services on COVID-19 Vaccines Advertising

The following information and communication materials have been provided to support your patient communications during the COVID-19 vaccines rollout. This should help providing information about which vaccine is available at your premises and support your conversations with patients as to which vaccine they can expect to receive.

You can now mention which vaccines you offer

The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) advises it is now acceptable to mention which brand of vaccine or vaccines your health organisation offers to patients. You still cannot make statements about one vaccine being better than another, and information should be accurate and balanced. You can find out more by visiting the TGA website.

Available resources

Below are some resources that you can use at your clinic, including posters, social content and web banners. Other supporting information about the COVID-19 vaccines, and the vaccine rollout, has also been provided.

These resources are reviewed regularly and will be updated as new information becomes available. More information for Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander people and clinics can be found on the website.

These posters are available for download from the Department of health website in PDF and Word format.

These are also available as social tiles and web banners.

The Department of Health appreciates everything that ACCHS are doing to keep people in Australia safe during this time. Please let us know if you need any of these resources in a different format, or if there is something new that you need by contacting covidvaccinecomms@health.gov.au.


Newsletter

The Department of Health releases a fortnightly newsletter, distributed to more than 800 subscribers, featuring key COVID-19 vaccine updates, and other health updates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

All newsletters are published to the Department of Health website, and all are welcome to subscribe.


Videos

aunty-val

This video shows Aunty Val and Lelani sharing a cup of tea, talking about the COVID-19 vaccine.

dr-lucas

Dr Lucas de Toca explains the importance of receiving the COVID-19 vaccine, even though some people may still catch the virus.

dr-mark-wenitong

Dr Mark Wenitong, GP in Indigenous Health for 25 years, reminds us to get information about COVID-19 vaccines from trusted sources.

prof-james-ward

Professor James Ward explains how COVID-19 vaccines work, and addresses some common misconceptions about the vaccines.


Community announcement radio scripts

Why is it important that most of us get vaccinated?

COVID-19 can be a very serious illness, especially for our Elders, and those in our community who have existing medical conditions.

 

Vaccines train your immune system to recognise and fight against specific viruses, like COVID-19. The COVID-19 vaccines are very effective at preventing serious sickness or death if you were to catch the virus.

 

When you get vaccinated, you are protecting yourself. When enough people are vaccinated, you are helping to protect the whole community.

We’ve seen with other vaccines that when enough people in the community are vaccinated, it slows down the spread of disease, and in some cases, it removes the threat of the disease altogether. For example, this includes very serious diseases such as measles, which is almost eradicated from Australia.

There is early evidence that shows COVID-19 vaccines also help reduce the spread of the virus.

The more people who are vaccinated against COVID-19, also makes outbreaks much less likely. This means that preventative measures, such as closing state borders and closing communities, may be needed less.

The COVID-19 vaccine is now available to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 16 years and over. If you are now eligible, take the opportunity to get the vaccine, to help protect the vulnerable and those who are too young or too sick to get the vaccine themselves.

To book your appointment, have a yarn with your local health care worker, or visit health.gov.au. For information about ___ (insert state/territory), visit ____ (insert Government health website – see list below).

 

Two doses of COVID-19 vaccine needed

Some parts of Australia are still get pretty cold, and people are travelling north, following the hot Australian sun. While we love to see more people exploring these wonderful parts of our country, with the risk of COVID-19 still out there, it’s important to do what we can to keep safe.

The vaccines are most effective when you’ve received two doses within the recommended timeframe.

The first dose of your vaccine will begin to build up a protective response against COVID-19 in your system.

The second dose will boost your immune response to ensure a long-term protection against COVID-19. Without the second dose, your body will not be able to fight the virus as effectively.

The COVID-19 vaccine is now available to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 16 years and over.

You might have some mild side effects, like for other vaccinations, such as a sore arm, headache or temperature. This is just your body building an immune response to the virus. If you have a side effect that worries you, speak with your healthcare worker.

When you have the chance to, take the opportunity to get the vaccine, to protect yourself, your family and your community. For information about ___ (insert state/territory), visit ____ (insert Government health website – see list below).

To book your appointment, have a yarn with your local healthcare worker, or visit health.gov.au.